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Kentucky Announcements



Broadband = Jobs
The recession is over for most of America, but it’s deepening in counties that lack broadband access. Not some counties. Almost all counties. Few communities can make do in today's fast-changing world without good access to the Information Highway. While it is true that broadband alone does not guarantee job growth, lack of ... Read the full story below.

A Community Toolkit
Get all the tools you need to conceive, plan, finance and run a community broadband network, either municipal-owned or in a public-private partnership. A special track devoted to the FTTH Council's comprehensive Community Toolkit starts Wednesday afternoon in Lexington with Stewart Overton, instructor with the training company ... Read the full story below.

What Planners Need to Know About Broadband
There's a dirty little secret in the community of community planners – few have any academic understanding or background about broadband. At a detailed workshop, Kathleen McMahon, Co-Chair of the American Planning Association's Smart City Task Force and ... Read the full story below.

Deep-Dive with NTIA's Kinkoph
As Acting Associate Administrator for the Office of Telecommunications and Information Applications (OTIA) for the National Telecommunications and Information Administration’s (NTIA) Office of Telecommunications Information and Applications at the U.S. Department of Commerce, Douglas Kinkoph leads ... Read the full story below.

Get a Legg Up!
In Lexington, you'll see a lot of Kentucky's own Hilda Legg. She's been a prominent broadband advocate and champion indeed. Legg served as the 15th Administrator of the US Department of Agriculture's Rural Utilities Service (RUS). Ms. Legg recently assumed the post of Vice Chair of Broadband Communities Magazine. She's and educator and ... Read the full story below.



Broadband = Jobs

The recession is over for most of America, but it’s deepening in counties that lack broadband access. Not some counties. Almost all counties. Few communities can make do in today's fast-changing world without good access to the Information Highway. While it is true that broadband alone does not guarantee job growth, lack of broadband kills communities. The relationship started becoming painfully obvious around 2010. Since then, U.S. counties that lack access to 25 Mbps broadband have actually lost population. Come to Lexington to learn how to reverse the curse.

The data comes not from a small sample of counties, but from all 3144 counties in the 50 states. The results are unprecedented. Most of the counties losing population are rural. Never before in U.S. history have a majority of rural counties actually lost population.

And while it can be argued that some counties lack broadband because they are rural, patterns in the national data shows that lack of broadband itself is by far the bigger cause. One key piece of evidence: Rural population loss is much greater precisely in the 20 states that ban municipalities from building or threatening to build their own broadband systems where incumbents will not or cannot provide modern broadband service.

For the past year, Broadband Communities has been looking at broadband access and population trends in every one of the nation’s 3144 counties. Our first article is a finalist for best original research by any business magazine in the American Society of Business Publication Editors competition. The more closely we look, the more sure we are of the link. In Lexington, editor Steve Ross will walk you through the compelling data and release our latest insights. You’ll see why the White House, Wall Street and the FCC have all taken notice. Want a preview? See our latest published information to get an idea of the detail.

A Community Toolkit

Get all the tools you need to conceive, plan, finance and run a community broadband network, either municipal-owned or in a public-private partnership. A special track devoted to the FTTH Council's comprehensive Community Toolkit starts Wednesday afternoon in Lexington with Stewart Overton, instructor with the training company The Light Brigade, detailing the needed management skills.

Kevin Morgan, former president of the FTTH Council and Director of Marketing at Huntsville-based ADTRAN, will describe what it takes for a community to organize, promote, and market broadband. The key to all successful implementations is identifying a champion and then working through community organizations to gain support and build momentum toward a successful enterprise.

Joanne Hovis, President, CTC Technology & Energy, focuses on the key elements that need to be covered in your business plan such as community approval, design, facility staffing and build, asset management, vendor and partner selection, construction build, content installation, and service and maintenance.

Next, you have to find people to build the network. Joseph Jones, Executive Director, OnTrac, and Kyle Hollifield, Senior Vice President, Magellan Advisors, will host a session on creating and issuing RFPs. This session will cover both private and public entities from two different viewpoints -- those of the network operator and the installation vendor. The model of network ownership your community chooses will determine the type of RFPs issued. Attendees will learn how to evaluate their internal knowledge about telecommunications, the desire of a community to own or control its own network asset, and the qualities needed in external suppliers.

Once communities decide to move forward, they must follow up their business plan with awarding those RFPs, creating schedules and beginning to manage the project—to be on time, on budget, and deliver what is needed. In a session run by Elliott Noss, CEO, Ting Fiber Internet, and Ron Frye, Communication Field Operations Supervisor, LUS Fiber (the gigabit operator in Lafayette, Louisiana), participants will learn steps they need to take to build, install, and maintain the fiber project.

Help Lead an
Electric Coop?

Take a deep dive at a daylong program showing how electric coops can add broadband to their service offerings. The Chief Executive Roundtable is designed for electric member cooperatives.

It covers the technology, the investment opportunities, and the pitfalls. To insure that any investment in broadband infrastructure will be worthwhile, traditional perspectives regarding Internet services must be replaced with a new cultural foundation built in partnership with the local community.

The foundation for next generation Internet service begins with an understanding that “Broadband is much more than access to the Internet.” It is an essential enabler for regional economic development and a higher quality of life for residents.

One of the more effective sources of unbiased advice and expert counsel are discussions with others who “have walked a mile” in your shoes. The EMC Roundtable this year will discuss the realities of broadband deployment and support with EMC executives and community leaders from a 12 state area around Lexington, Kentucky.

Discussion will include:

  • Developments in broadband delivery
  • Broadband business strategies
  • The principal accountability best practices
  • Leadership development programs
  • Project management metrics best practices
  • How to instill a culture of exceptional service
  • Structuring an ownership transition
  • Effective teaming strategies


The workshop leaders are David W. Daugherty - Founder & CEO, Korcett, and several high-level members of his management team including Marty Wold - Vice President, On Campus Solutions, and Robert Martin, Vice President, Technical Operations. But most of the input will come from participants sharing experiences, fears, and triumphs.

 


What Planners Need to Know About Broadband

There's a dirty little secret in the community of community planners – few have any academic understanding or background about broadband. At a detailed workshop, Kathleen McMahon, Co-Chair of the American Planning Association's Smart City Task Force and Chair of the American Planning Association Technology Division, will fill in the gaps.

McMahon founded Applied Communications in 1994. Her consulting practice has focused on helping rural areas develop strategies for broadband infrastructure. She speaks frequently on strategic planning for broadband and routinely contributes articles on the topic to professional journals.

She worked with the Montana Broadband program to conduct planning meetings throughout the state that resulted in 14 regional broadband action plans. McMahon was also part of the project team for the broadband mapping projects in Montana and North DakotaShe is the co-author of the American Planning Publication “Planning and Broadband: Infrastructure, Policy and Sustainability”.

Ms. McMahon has a bachelor's degree in Urban and Regional Planning from the University of Illinois and 20 years of city planning experience. In 1998, she received a masters in Educational Technology from George Washington University. She is a member of the American Institute of Certified Planners and is a founding member and Past President of the Rural Telecommunications Congress.

Plan to be there!


Deep-Dive with NTIA's Kinkoph

As Acting Associate Administrator for the Office of Telecommunications and Information Applications (OTIA) for the National Telecommunications and Information Administration’s (NTIA) Office of Telecommunications Information and Applications at the U.S. Department of Commerce, Douglas Kinkoph leads the $4.3 billion Broadband Technology Opportunities Program (BTOP).

He oversaw distribution of BTOP grants that funded the deployment of broadband infrastructure, public computer centers, sustainable adoption of broadband service, and the statewide broadband planning and data collection initiative, leading to the creation of the National Broadband Map.

Kinkoph also directs NTIA’s post-BTOP Strategic Initiatives to promote broadband deployment and adoption across communities nationwide.

A telecommunications policy expert, Kinkoph has more than two decades of experience in both the public and private sectors. He held multiple executive roles in the communications industry before joining the Department of Commerce. Most recently, Mr. Kinkoph was Vice President of Operations at Soundpath Conferencing, responsible for all Sales, Marketing and Customer Service operations. His private sector experience also includes serving in senior regulatory and policy roles at XO Communications, Nextlink, and LCI. Kinkoph earned his M.A. in Administration from Central Michigan University and his BS in Telecommunication Management from Ohio University.

Get a Legg Up!

In Lexington, you'll see a lot of Kentucky's own Hilda Legg. She's been a prominent broadband advocate and champion indeed. Legg served as the 15th Administrator of the US Department of Agriculture's Rural Utilities Service (RUS). Ms. Legg recently assumed the post of Vice Chair of Broadband Communities Magazine. She's an educator and advocate. In both public and private life, she has been committed to encouraging economic growth while helping improve the quality of life in all of rural America.

Few people better understand the needs of underserved communities. Appointed by President George W. Bush and confirmed by a unanimous vote of the U.S. Senate on September 27, 2001, Legg administered a $6 billion loan and grant program for the infrastructure needs of rural America through Water and Environmental, Telecommunications and Rural Electrification Programs.

RUS is part of USDA’s Rural Development mission, which also includes agencies that serve rural housing, business, and community facility needs. A long-time advocate of holistic approaches to economic development in rural America, Ms. Legg entered public service in Washington, D.C. from The Center for Rural Development in Somerset, Kentucky, where she served seven years as Executive Director and CEO. She was responsible for the overall management of the state-of-the-art facility as well as program development and outreach. The Center was and is considered a national model for economic development.

In 1990, Ms. Legg was appointed by President George Bush as Alternate Federal Co-Chairman for the Appalachian Regional Commission in Washington, D.C. Her primary responsibilities were to represent and promote the economic policies for the region’s 21 million people, and to assist in the management of a $190 million budget aimed at job creation, building infrastructure, education and workforce training and numerous research programs relative to rural economic development.

 

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